1936 Newspaper Sport Stamps Set and Checklist

‘It’s In The Details’

Title Newspaper Sport Stamps Set
Year 1936
Size Varies by Cut
Images Black and White
Type Stamps
Number in Set
Unknown

1936 Newspaper Sport Stamps Set Overview

1936 Sport Stamps.jpgSimilar to other issues such as the Rinkeydink set, the 1936 Sport Stamps are simply cutouts directly from newspapers. Both baseball and football were offered. In addition to the pro teams in those sports, collegians and minor leaguers were included, too.

Numerous newspapers distributed these and some included:

  • Atlanta Georgian-American
  • Boston American
  • Chicago American
  • Detroit Times
  • Los Angeles Examiner
  • Pittsburgh Sun-Telegraph
  • Sporting News
  • Sunday Advertiser

The Sporting News stamps included baseball players that made the All-Star team.

There wasn’t much variation in terms of the design on these. They were printed in the shape of a large postage stamp with the word ‘SPORT’ written vertically on the left side of the picture and ‘STAMP’ on the right. Above the player’s image was the name of the newspaper and at the bottom was his name, position, and team in a thin rectangle. Below the stamp was a short biography of the player. Some collectors kept the bio portion cutting around it and including it with the stamp while others simply removed that part.

The classification of these as a stamp rests on the images. While many would question their collectability, they are slightly different from a cut out of a picture in the newspaper as they bear the name ‘Sport Stamp’ on them and the outline is in the shape of a postage stamp. For that reason, they were supposed to be cut out from the newspaper, which is why some would consider them a form of card.

The stamps do have some value but, despite their rarity, are not incredibly expensive. A lot featuring 65 of them with numerous Hall of Famers recently sold for only about $8.00 per stamp.

1936 Newspaper Sport Stamps Set Checklist

Due to the large size of this set, a full checklist is not currently known.

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